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tv   MSNBC Live  MSNBC  August 23, 2014 11:00am-1:01pm PDT

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everybody knew he wasn't a bad guy. he wasn't an aggressive guy. he wasn't evil. he wasn't disrespectful. you know, all the way up to the day he died. he gave them officers respect all the way until he couldn't breathe no more. >> right now, a large crowd gathered in the streets in staten island, new york, demanding justice for eric gardner. he's the man who died after nypd officers put him in a choke hold last month. we'll take you live to that rally again, which is going on right now. more fallout in ferguson, missouri after the death of michael brown. this time, the fallout is over two police officers. they are in the hot seat. also, we're hearing from supporters, supporters of officer darren wilson making their voices heard this afternoon.
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also today, could the u.s. war against isis militants spread from iraq to syria? the terror group operates in both countries, and president obama's defense team says going after isis in iraq alone is having limited impact. we'll tell you what the options are at this moment for the u.s. good afternoon to you all. thank you so much for being here. i'm t.j. holmes. we do have that breaking story. all eyes right now on staten island where there's a massive rally going on. it's well under way now. people there protesting the police choke hold death of eric gardner. we'll give you a look at the podium where the family of eric gardner is speaking alongside the reverend al sharpton. you see him at the podium. reverend sharpton the head of the national action network and msnbc host. his national action network organized this march and rally today. most of these marchers that you're seeing there, they've been demonstrating for a little while this morning. they arrived by bus a little earlier today. >> the violence completely has to stop. you have to learn how to deal
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with people in a different manner, in a better way. >> i'm getting a little emotional because there's too many incidents -- they're using too much. but i'm here to represent my family because i have a son and five grandsons. >> the rally taking place right now follows a march earlier today near the location where 43-year-old eric gardner was arrested for selling loose cigarettes last month. his arrest was captured on video. he died when an officer apparently used a choke hold to restrain him. that is a tactic that has been prohibited by the nypd since the 1994 death of another man, anthony baez. the medical examiner ruled his death a homicide. a grand jury has been convened. meantime, the community has been put on high alert. take a look at that, folks. the staten island chamber of commerce issued this. you see there in red at the top,
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it says security alert. this out to local businesses. the flier points out that as with any assembly of this size, talking about the rally today, security and safety becomes an issue. it goes on to say once the march is over, those attending will be generally unsupervised. in response to that, many local businesses did indeed close their shops today. todd johnson joins me now live from the rally. we can see that scene and hear it as well. but certainly a good size crowd. we talked about that security alert that went out from the chamber of commerce there. that's really a response to some of the pictures that a lot of people saw coming out of ferguson, missouri, over the past couple of weeks. >> t.j., you're right. those business owners were certainly watching tv just like the rest of us and seeing kind of the unrest and chaos unfold in ferguson. and just wanted to be more safe than sorry. but i can tell you that today, the morning has gone largely without incident. the only problem today is just
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congestion, because there's so many people. there's thousands of people as reverent sharpton just indicated, addressing the crowd. marching for a number of different reasons. many are obviously for eric garner, but also keeping michael brown and the others who have died at the hands of police while unarmed on their mind. reverend sharpton and others who have taken the podium, including religious leaders and also eric garner's family, they're encouraging the crowd not to be against the police, but again, against the abuse of power that many feel the police used when they put eric garner in a choke hold and cost him his life. there's going to be several more speakers probably for the next hour. several response chants earlier today. there were chants of "i can't breathe, i can't breathe" making reference to the fact that eric garner yelled that while he was on the ground, in sort of the police choke hold that we've seen on the videotapes. other chants, hands up, don't
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shoot. a clear reference to what's going on in ferguson. so reverend sharpton is taking the podium. but a largely peaceful and a very largely loud gathering today in staten island. >> all right, our todd johnson. we'll keep a close eye on what's happening. we'll be checking back in in a few minutes, but that live rally happening now. good size crowd gathered in staten island to oppose police brutality. don't be against the police, just against an abuse of force. we're going to turn to ferguson now. it's been two weeks almost to the hour since the unarmed teen michael brown was shot and killed by police officer darren wilson. at this moment, young people gathering in st. louis for a rally demanding justice for michael brown as well. it's been organized by the naacp. also this afternoon, a group of supporters of officer darren wilson. who are not speaking on behalf of the officers. we certainly want to make sure we note. they're rallying in support of him.
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they asked other supporters to call and write governor jay nixon to demand an end to what they call bias against officer wilson. michael brown played offensive tackle, kicked off its season with a moment of silence in his honor. all over town today in this week from food banks to prayer circles, people are coming together to clean up and try to build back up. overnight, local leaders, a third night of peaceful protests. this time without a single arrest. but as a strained and still very much frustrated community looks forward. new word this afternoon that two police officers involved in policing the protests have been suspended from their departments after being accused of making offensive comments. we'll start with st. louis county officer dan page. you're seeing him right there. he spent time on the ferguson force. disciplined over comments made in 2012 and posted on youtube,
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apparently referring to his military service. listen to this. >> i've killed a lot. and if i need to, i'll kill a whole bunch more. >> the st. louis county police department posted this statement on facebook. "the statements made about killings are unacceptable and not what we are about at this department." meanwhile, in nearby glendale, officer matthew pappert was accused of making these comments on his facebook page. "i'm sick of these protesters. you are a burden on society and a blight on the community." also goes on to say, "great, thugs and white trash all in one location." >> the posts in our opinion were very concerning, very shocking to us. we would have never thought that one of our police officers would have made such posts. >> let me turn to msnbc correspondent richard lui, who is there in ferguson for us. we know a rally is going on now, naacp youth rally happening in st. louis. give us the feeling there on the ground that we've got news, maybe about these police
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officers, reaction to that. but also the fact that we know that a grand jury will, in fact, be reviewing this case and the news of the -- i guess the racial makeup of that grand jury. >> you kn >> reporter: good day to you. a very good question. that's what's happening today. on any other day, you might have a much different reaction here in the streets here in ferguson. that naacp rally is right up the block here from where we're at, and with the revelations of both the suspensions of those two officers and as well the grand jury composition, that being three african-americans and nine caucasians, when you speak with those both on the streets as well as those who are in the community as leaders, it's simply this. they shake their head. and they say, well, that is what we are trying to fight. that's what those who are critical of those decisions. on the other side, all those activities -- you know, t.j., that's what's happening today.
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saturday and sunday. so many activities in the city. people going out to volunteer. just across the street, we had two different religious groups giving out lunches a little bit earlier. we have a rally beginning on. as you mentioned, the naacp today, this evening, there's a collection of individuals, including law enforcement officers, going to go out and give food. we have tomorrow another what's called a peace fest, so with all that happening, one has to say they're moving at least the activity set to what is different than wwe seen in the past. in any other situation, we would probably see a greater reaction to the developments that you were just telling us about. >> richard lui, we'll be checking in with you again. thank you so much. we do know the makeup of that st. louis county grand jury tasked with deciding whether police officer darren wilson will face criminal charges for shooting and killing michael brown. the 12-member panel, you're seeing them here. three african-americans, 25% in
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a county that's about 18% black. a judge is expected to consider on monday whether to make public the ages and hometowns of each juror. in order to indict darren wilson, nine of the 12 panelists must agree. let me turn now to tommy pearson. he's state representative and a pastor at a church. i want to get your reaction to calm of things. first, your reaction to the makeup of that grand jury. >> well, i think there again, we see that the deck is always stacked against us. it's stacked against us on the force. it's now stacked against us on the grand jury. >> tell me your reaction as well. we saw a short time ago, and you may be well aware of it. you may have been in the neighborhood. a rally for officer darren wilson. what is it doing, and certainly they have their right to be supportive of officer wilson. he has his supporters out there. a lot of his supporters are
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raising a lot of money on his behalf. what is that doing to the community at this point? are people respecting the other sides, their right to support darren wilson, or is it a bit divisive right now for the community? >> i think the community respects their right to support whomever they want. and it is our right to support who we want. and that's just how i feel about it. i don't think that even some of my friends, some of my caucasian friends are talking about how they love north county and all that. i remind them that a young man lost his life, an unarmed young man. we got to let this thing play out before we start taking sides. >> like you say, taking sides. some have pointed out, like i mention, some of the crowd-funding support that officer darren wilson is getting. his supporters have raised more money.
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almost $300,000 more, compared to michael brown. some of the pictures we're showing up and putting up right now. it seems like the community, things have quieted down over the last few nights in terms of protests. not necessarily protests. some of the violence and the rioting and the looting that we have been seeing. is the community starting to come forward? starting to see signs that the community is starting to support each other in a positive way. you're on the ground involved in community. what's your feel? >> i think the community is coming together. you have a segment of the community that's just like the police officer who shot this unarmed man. you know, they're not going to help in any way to bring justice to this case. it is ours to do it. and we'll do it. >> are you starting -- there's more coming out about -- we don't know a lot about the incident itself. but people are starting to i
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guess get into the legal background, and starting to get into some of those details. are you going to try to get the community ready in case there isn't an indictment, and in case there isn't a conviction? that's a long way down the road, but there is a legal case to be made, and people are starting to bring up precedent and how much leeway is given to an officer who is put in a life-threatening situation. >> yeah, we are. we're starting to talk about next steps. what did we do? if there is -- if the jury don't indict and even if they indict, if they go to court and to get off, we're starting to talk about some next steps. all of those are not formulated yet. but when the time comes, we'll be ready. >> i know you'll be out there day in and day out. we appreciate you taking some more time with us. we know we'll see you again.
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>> all right, thank you. >> we're 13 minutes past the hour. could america's battle against isis spread into syria? we've seen air strikes, but moving into syria is easier said than done. we will explain. h, hebrew natio. their all-beef like yours but they're also kosher. so, not just any beef goes into it. oh, honey! oh! here, have some of ours. oh! hebrew national. a hot dog you can trust. that's keeping you from the healthcare you deserve.. at humana, we believe the gap will close when healthcare changes. when frustration and paperwork decrease. when healthcare becomes simpler. so let's do it. let's simplify healthcare. let's close the gap between people and care.
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they hold territory, they're well-funded, they're well-organized and they're motivated to attack us. and you have these thousands of foreign fighters, and many coming from europe, some coming from the united states who have become further radicalized there, and ultimately will come home or try to come home. and that's an enormous threat to us. >> congressman adam schiff this morning on msnbc talking about the growing threat by the isis terror organization. pentagon officials say recent air strikes in iraq have been successful in disrupting some of
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their activities. those same leaders acknowledge that to fully contain the group, a military campaign will have to expand beyond iraq. >> it requires a variety of instruments, only one small part of which is air strikes. i'm not predicting those will occur in syria. at least not by the united states of america. but it requires the application of all of the tools of national power, diplomatic, economic, information, military. >> when it comes to the prospect of u.s. intervention in syria, one of the biggest challenges the black holes in our intelligence. we saw that this week after learning of a failed hostage rescue to find james foley, who was later killed by isis. evan coleman is an nbc news terrorism analyst here. how much did that change things, that video that came out this week? changed just the tone, change any thinking by the white house or the pentagon? >> look, i think it's changed the political dynamic. i think it's given the american public a very cogent reason
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about why the u.s. should get back involved in iraq or why the u.s. should be confronting isis. i think the administration was having a lot of trouble trying to sell the idea of a u.s. involvement in either iraq or syria prior to this event and now it's become painfully evident about why it is the u.s. has to become involved or what it is the u.s. has to do and why that impacts u.s. national security. >> you said sell the idea to the american public, but did our policymakers and our leaders get that isis needed to be confronted in the way that everybody seems to think so now? but did they get it before this? >> no, i don't think that they did. i think the best indication about that is clearly the white house and the obama administration has been aware that syria is the hub of isis activi activity. obviously this raid took place back in july over a month ago, and yet still the conversation has been about avoiding any kind of involvement in syria. if isis's headquarters is in syria, we know it is, it's not a question, why didn't we strike there earlier, and particularly now because of the fact that what we're seeing is reports
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that in fact isis people are abandoning their headquarters, their major bases, because we know they're going to be targeted. it would have made a lot more sense if we were going to do this to have it done as a surprise, rather than telegraph our intentions and allow these guys to prep for what we're going to do. >> but is it true that you can't defeat isis without taking them on in syria? >> absolutely. i mean, look, i've given this analogy before. it's like world war ii. if you try to fight germany exclusively in france and you ignore germany and belgium and all these other countries, you can't do that. this is an enemy that's a transnational enemy. it's a transnational insurgent group, terrorist group, military group, whatever you want to call it. to fight it in one country is giving credence to a border that isis doesn't recognize. isis doesn't care about any so-called border between iraq and syria. why are we paying attention to it? and look, i understand the idea that we don't want to destabilize syria. i don't begrudge the white house. it's a terribly difficult set of
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decisions that they've been left with. nonetheless, for u.s. national security reasons, i think there's been a lot of evidence, not since the last week, but for many months that u.s. national interests are in play in syria, that syria has been turned into a giant training camp for a variety of different al qaeda factions, including the islamic state of iraq, and it's up to us to make the motions now to try to stop that. >> enemy of my enemy is my friend. does that work here with al assad in syria and the u.s.? >> that's part of the complications, that the obama administration is very loathe to get involved in syria because it does not want to be supporting the government of al assad. let's not forget, it was exactly a year ago that we were talking about launching air strikes targeting the asaad regime because of their use of barrel bombs and chemical weapons against innocent people. and against the rebels. part of the calculus is we don't want to upset the delicate balance of syria and give assad the edge in terms of fighting his adversaries. but look, as bad as the regime of al assad is, it's not a u.s.
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national security threat. they're not planning on launching attacks in the united states. the assad regime is not planning that. al qaeda, the islamic state of iraq, the other groups that are active in syria, they are. and they want to do this. and they have people that can do this. they have foreign fighters there from the u.s., from france, from the uk. that is a national security threat. so i think we have to prioritize what's most important here. we don't necessarily have to provide aid to the assad regime, but maybe we have to recognize that whether or not it destabilizes syria further, we may have no choice but to strike isis because it's a threat to us. >> evan coleman, always appreciate your insights. again, nbc news terrorism analyst. thank you so much. i know we'll be talking to you again. >> thank you very much. we're also keeping a close eye on the developing situation in the middle east. the exchange of gunfire between hamas and israel continuing today as egypt is calling on both parties to resume peace talks. the israeli military saying a hamas mortar attack which killed a 4-year-old israeli child on friday was launched out of a
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is today. here are some of the top headlines we are keeping an eye on. demonstrators rallying right now in staten island, demanding justice for the death of eric garner. the 34-year-old died last month while being subdued by new york city police in an apparent choke hold. you're seeing a live picture of that rally on staten island right now. we'll get back and check in in just a few minutes. also overseas in iraq, a suicide bomber drove a car full of explosives into the interior ministry building in central baghdad, killing at least 11 people. violence also erupting in the iraqi city of kirkuk, where ten were killed. angela merkel is in kiev for talks on how to end the ongoing crisis along the ukraine-russia border.
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her visit comes as a highly scrutinized russian aid convoy has left ukraine, crossing back over the border. more testing will be needed. look at that. this after an unmanned rocket exploded during a test flight over central texas friday. nobody injured. it was launched by the space ex company which is trying to develop a reusable rocket. again, that rally for eric garner taking place right now. he's the man who died after an nypd officer put him in a choke hold last month. we've been watching what's happening in staten island. we'll take you back there where his supporters are gathered. and we're also watching what's happening at that rally closely, because it's connected in a lot of ways to what's happening in ferguson, missouri. it's been exactly two weeks since an officer there killed an unarmed teenager. talk to a noted law professor and longtime friend of attorney general eric holder about the next legal steps. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to
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the breaking story this hour, take a look at that, folks. a lot of people, i don't have the exact head count, but this is in staten island. a big rally in support of 43-year-old eric garner. he was killed in police custody. this was back in july after he was put in an apparent choke hold. a story that really got a lot of people talking because there was video of that actual choke hold that everybody was able to see. but this is happening right now in staten island. of course, choke hold is p prohibited by the nypd. it's been prohibited about 20 years. the city's medical examiner ruled garner's death was a homicide. the d.a. hasn't yet decided if any charges could be filed against the officers involved, but a grand jury has been convened. msnbc host and president of the national action network al sharpton helped organize today's march and rally. here's what he had to say. this was just a few moments ago. >> no justice! >> no peace! >> no justice! >> no peace!
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>> we are not here to tear down. we're here to build up. we are not here to cause violence. we are here because violence was caused. we are not against police. most police do their jobs. but those that break the law must be held accountable, just like anybody else. >> correspondent todd johnson joins me now from that rally position. is that kind of the tone we are hearing? there was a lot of criticism earlier saying that this was just a big rally, an anti-police rally. >> reporter: i've certainly heard that today, but you heard that sound from the reverend, that they're trying to kind of change the narrative of what this situation is about. not about what eric garner was
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doing at the time he encountered police, but what happened to him and how he lost his life, and that's, again, the theme of the day. not anti-police, but against the abuses of power that many in the crowd feel the police are using too often on unarmed young black men to get their point across. and i think also it really was put into perspective from the family of eric garner, able to go on the stage, look out at the crowd, and kind of take it all in from where they were standing at the podium. >> this is just so overwhelming. give yourself a hand. give yourself a hand. thank you for all that you've done for us. >> i'm the baby girl. i miss my father a lot. and for everybody to be here, it's amazing. thank you for standing up for my father, and everybody else who's a victim of police brutality. we're not going to stop. >> i appreciate everybody for being on their best behavior, because we know how to act, yes?
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yes? >> we've heard too many excuses. >> so, t.j., you can just hear the outpouring of appreciation and thank yous from the garner family, and how much they appreciate the crowd kind of keeping it in control. we've seen the images from ferguson. we know what happens when those types of things can get out of hand. we get farther and farther away from dealing with what happened to these young men. so again, the reverend sharpton, the national action network, and the family of eric garner stressing how important it was for everyone today to kind of keep in mind what this is about. this is about eric garner. this is about what happened to him and other unarmed young black men at the hands of police, and to keep the focus on that as everyone moves forward. >> todd johnson for us down there in staten island. we'll check in with you once again. we're watching the rally and the nypd closely today because of what's happening 950 miles west of staten island. we're talking about ferguson, missouri. people protested the shooting of
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michael brown again overnight, but the crowds were smaller and remained peaceful. it's been exactly two weeks since officer wilson shot and killed the unarmed 18-year-old. st. louis county prosecutors this week convened a grand jury to begin hearing evidence in the case, and today we have the racial makeup of that grand jury. let me bring in harvard professor of law charles ogletree. mr. ogletree, always good to talk to you. did you have any concerns when you first heard about the makeup of that grand jury? we can put it up on the screen. 12 jurors, three african-americans, nine caucasians. did you have any concerns? what was your reaction? >> i had no reaction negative, because i think the grand jury can decide the case appropriately. this is a case where the evidence is very clear. the police officer shot and killed michael brown without any justification. shot him multiple times. the photographs are out now. the autopsy has been performed by multiple groups. i think that this grand jury will indict the officer for a
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number of charges. i suspect and hope that he'll be arrested soon, taken to jail, and tried by a jury. a jury can find him not guilty. they can find him guilty. but i think that this case is not going to go away, t.j., and i think that people are saying to themselves right now, what we saw lost with 18-year-old michael brown is a devastating impact for the community of jefferson, missouri. and i think that a community almost 70% african-american, has three blacks on the police force out of 53. it's a community that doesn't control the politics. people are going to vote, they're going to register to vote, they're going to have peaceful demonstrations. i think all that's going to change in ferguson, missouri, and i think that's a good thing for the communcommunity. >> you're a professor of law. you say you believe the evidence is pretty clear, that the grand jury will indict. but how much is it going to come into play as well?
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it sounds like it's cut-and-dry, like how could he shoot an unarmed 18-year-old that many times. but they have -- there's a different standard for police officers when it comes to using force. something that's called objectively reasonable in light of the facts and circumstances. the you think that still could come into play in this case, or do you think that standard -- maybe throw that standard out in some way because you think the evidence is so strong in this case? >> i think the evidence is strong in this case, no question about that. but in cases from the west coast to the central part of the country, to the east part of the country, police officers have been killing young black men over and over again. johnny cochran, my late friend, the great lawyer in california, before he died, did a great job with all these choke holds the police were using, and had some civil judgments against police officers. but i think that you can try the police officers and rodney king. i think they'll be walking away. i think we need to do something to straighten that out.
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one thing, more blacks on the police force. more community voting. more people active in their communities. i think that the lessons of this funeral on monday will give us a sense of what's going to go forward and what we have to do as a community. >> you said your late friend cochran and your other friend eric holder, he was in town in ferguson this past week. and things certainly suddenly calmed down. maybe they're on the way to calming down anyway, but it seemed like overnight after he was there. what are you seeing now on the ground there? is there a concern -- there was some talk this morning that once things start to quiet down, we get a sense that things are going back to normal and peaceful again and maybe we still don't take that moment and turn it into a movement. are you concerned about moving forward, that maybe we lose some of the momentum that has been gained and the anger and the targeted anger, if you will, for the changes you talk about need to happen in ferguson on the police force and in political circles? >> i don't think it's going to
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calm down until it changes. it has to change in significant ways. eric holder, i've known him for decades. when he was a u.s. attorney in d.c. when he was a partner at a law firm in d.c. when he was a superior court judge in d.c. i've known eric in many, many different capacities. i think that it is a tribute to the idea that this is being taken out of local hands, and the federal government is getting involved. i think eric holder is going to make a big difference, and i'm calling on him and expecting him to do what he said he's going to do. he's met with the family. he's met with children there. he's been involved in ferguson, missouri, and i think that that is the crux of what's going to be happening. i think that we have to realize what happened before. our mentors, people like andrew young, people like stevie vincent, all these folks very active in movements before, and i think we have to make sure that we're going to do that. my dear friend and client now harry belafonte told me that
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he's involved in what's happening in ferguson. this is not an issue that's going to go away, even though it's calming down. i think it's not going to go away until we see a transformation of this community that's black controlled, black minority, african-american minorities are controlling the city. they have to make sure they're rung for positions in the city. they're holding those positions. and we hope to be having a story a year from now, t.j., that says this community of jefferson has changed in a significant way and we're ready to go forward. >> professor charles ogletree, it's been a while. i'm sure i'll talk to you again soon. >> my pleasure. coming up, folks, rick perry hitting the road with two felony charges under his belt now. he's in new hampshire at this hour, still testing the presidential waters. we'll tell you what he plans to do next. and the future of farming may be all wet. they're called floating farms. we'll talk to the architect behind this project in today's "big idea." [ female announcer ] it's simple physics...
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keeping an eye on a tropical disturbance forming in the caribbean. it's not well-defined at this point, but notes it could develop to a tropical storm at some point this weekend as it continues to move west-northwest near the bahamas. meanwhile, in the northwest and across the country, the u.s. has more than 400 million acres it sets aside for farming. but what about countries that simply don't have the space? how can they get fresh fruits and vegetables? in singapore, there are nearly 20,000 people for every square mile, making it one of the densest countries in the world. almost all of its food is brought in from other countries. o there is now a plan to grow food in the middle of the ocean. it's today's big idea. javier, thank you for being here. we do have a bit of a delay, about a four-second delay, so just bear with us to our viewers. so you tell me these floating farms, how close is this to
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becoming a reality? >> hello. thanks for having me. as you mentioned, this floating farms is a strategic project for small countries. they don't have enough land. we have already contacted the singapore authorities and they have already ideas with them. but we're still waiting. at this moment, i guess this is a really conceptual project. but it deals with lack of space, lack of farmable land. as you mentioned, it is quite a dense country, so we believe here that singapore can be a really interesting testing spot for agriculture and in the
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water. >> and what kind of food could we expect from possible floating farm. >> well, basically, we proposed to have existing technologies inside them with a-frame agriculture systems, and we can expect leafy vegetables, like lettuce. we can also have fruits, strawberries. it aims to be a year-round crop production of different crops. i guess the main thing here is that we aim to avoid a lot of food waste by producing the exact -- the exact number and type of vegetables or crops according to the city data analysis. >> last thing here, how expensive is it to get one of these up and running?
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and also what other areas -- you said singapore is one. but just name maybe a few other places where something like this could be beneficial? >> well, for your first question, it is quite early for us to give an exact number right now. we are actually developing right now some tests and some computer option options. for example, in deserts, we have this other project that we are developing right now that is aimed for the arabian desert. so if we can develop this with solar energy, we can have maybe a good fusion of technologies. so it is suitable for different
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places. >> floating farms is the idea. we might be seeing you down the road. >> thank you so much for being here. to our viewers, if you have a big idea as well, you can let us know about it on twitter. you can use the #what's the big idea. we're about 12 of the top of the hour. several rallies going on across the country. a rally happening in staten island for eric garner. there's also a rally taking place today for darren wilson, supporters of officer darren wilson, yes, the man who, in fact, shot mike brown. people there showing their support for him. this was at a rally today just a short time ago in st. louis. we want you to take a quick listen. >> officer wilson's actions on august 9th were warranted and justified and he has our unwavering support. we believe that the evidence has
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and will continue to validate our position. we want to thank the media for finally highlighting the other side of this story. however, the media has shown a strong bias against the supporters of officer wilson. think the tree we carved our names in is still here? probably dead... how much fun is this? what? what a beautiful sunset... if you like sunsets. whether you're sweet or salty... you'll love nature valley sweet and salty bars. [guy] i know what you're you're thinking beneful. [announcer]beneful has wholesome grains,real beef,even accents of spinach,carrots and peas.
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when congress reconvenes and president obama gets to face a plun republican congress and a republican senate, he will have a date with destiny and that is constitutional limits. because standing up for the rule of law is what washington and the president is supposed to be about. i'm standing up for the rule of law in texas. in a lot of different ways. >> being indicted on two felonies could have been the best thing to ever happen to governor rick perry. certainly listening to him.
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the texas republican is scheduled to make three stops before crowds in new hampshire today, since his indictment. and advisers say sign-ups to attend his events have "gone through the roof." and that's not all. the texas governor is traveling to south carolina next week. both key place where is anyone seeking a presidential nomination. we bring in political science professor victoria defrancesco desoto. new hampshire, iowa on the schedule. is this the best thing to ever happen to him, to get indicted? >> you know, a lot of folks are saying that, but i'm going to put myself squarely in the other camp. let's say that it doesn't necessarily hurt him, but i don't see how it can help him. we don't know what's going on yet. the prosecution has yet to lay out its case, so i think that the hype that the perry folks are putting forward is a lot of smoke and mirrors, a lot of facade there. but if i'm a donor and rick perry is saying hey, can you give to my campaign for the 2016
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election, i'm going to be a little bit nervous that there's that indictment hanging over him. so i'm going to play it cautious here. >> here's something else he said on thursday in washington, talking about some of his supporters right now. this maybe threw some people off. watch this. >> when david axelrod, lanny davis, jonathan chat all say that this is sketchy, outrageous, totalitarian, and mccarthy-ite, i agree with them. and that's just on the democrat side of the aisle. >> are you seeing that, and why? democrats. maybe some high-profile democrats even coming to his side on this whole indictment situation. >> you know, the split that i am seeing is between national political analysts and texas political analysts. those of us here on the ground who have been watching perry for 14 years, more than 14 years, more of the time that he's been governor, know that he plays
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hardball and he has played really close to the line for a long time. and he has skirted that line this time. maybe nothing will come of it. but we know that governor perry is not an innocent white dove, and people are just loading all of this on top of him. and the other thing that i find ironic is that he is saying that this is just a political witch hunt, when he is the one who initially made it a political issue, when he grandstanded against the d.a. so he's throwing rock in a glass house here. >> if he decides to run -- i use that as an f, and some people laugh at that and say of course he's running. but how is the indictment actually on his list of issues, of cons, if you will, if people are looking at him and considering him as a candidate? i mean, he has -- he has other problems in the state, and some of his policy issues. you know, some of what he went through the last time he ran for president, it didn't go so well. some of that stuff will come up. so is the indictment really that high on the list of cons if people are considering him?
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>> i think it is. because you're absolutely right. he had a really rough start out of the gate. in 2012, he really tried to rebrand himself. but this indictment, you just don't know what's going to happen. if it goes away in the next couple of weeks, next couple of months, okay maybe he can ignore it, but it still took time and money away from him. and if there is something there, then that is going to completely handicap him, and you can just see chris christie and jindal and jeb bush doing the happy dance going thank god for this indictment for rick perry. >> all right, we will leave it on the happy dance. victoria defrancesco soto, thank you, and good luck in three weeks. we will talk to you soon. coming up, we'll take you back to staten island, new york. a rally happening right now. take a look at that screen. a lot of people on the streets of staten island demanding justice for eric garner. he's the man who died after a nypd officer put him in a choke hold last month.
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we want to thank reverend al sharpton, everybody who participated in in lovely gathering. >> i just want to really send a special shoutout to the brother that took the video. >> right now, crowd rallying in staten island, new york, along with eric garner's family demanding justice. garner is the man who died after an nypd officer put him in a choke hold last month. we are live on staten island. also, rallies and support in ferguson this hour as well. the city coming together as more information emerges about the legal process ahead. also we're now hearing more from the supporters of officer darren wilson. the execution of american journalist james foley highlights again that european nationals may be fighting with isis in syria and iraq.
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we'll show you what's happening right now to find the terrorist who killed foley. and fresh fears and questions, after two new cases of ebola have health officials worried worldwide. we'll explain what you can learn from these new patients. and a woman is making history, breaking the glass back board in the nba. we'll meet the leader who will soon be calling all the shots for the players association. good afternoon to you all. thank you so much for being here. i'm t.j. holmes. that breaking story we've been keeping an eye on today, a large rally for eric garner on staten island, new york. the scene near the neighborhood that you're seeing there where 43-year-old father of six eric garner was killed while in police custody. an officer apparently put him in a choke hold, which is prohibited by the nypd. the city's medical examiner ruled garner's death a homicide. this incident was caught on video. the video you're seeing there. today garner's family thanked the man who took these photos of
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that controversial arrest. >> i just want to really send a special shoutout to the brother that took the video, because for the first time in history, we got proof on tape that the police be doing us dirty. now i thank that brother. i thank him. from the bottom of my heart, he's part of my family now. >> before that, eric garner's widow paused at the site where her husband was arrested and died on july 19th. of course, you can imagine the great sadness the family has right now, but the tone of the march has been pretty up beat. i want to bring in todd johnson, he joins us now from that rally. we still see a lot of people active behind you. want to bring up something we just heard from a family member of eric garner on the stage, saying that video shows how the police do us dirty. yes, he was emotional there
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onstage at the time. but they also want to make the point that this is not an anti-police rally. >> reporter: yes, t.j. we've heard that over and over again today, that this gathering shouldn't be viewed by members of the media or anyone in the outside world that they are gathering against the police department. many people gathered here respect and say they respect purposes and intentions of police officers. but that doesn't mean that they can't stand up and say that police officers have abused their power. the video that everyone's seen of eric garner being taken down and choked by members of the new york police department has everyone up in arms still as we think of ferguson, and the people gather here say the names of michael brown, whose funeral is coming up on monday. but the anti-police sentiment is
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really towards police methods and practices. which is why a lot of people are hopeful that they are going to retrain 35,000 officers, it's actually going to happen and be a good thing. so those are the kind of messages and kind of the sentiment of the day, that yes, folks are up in arms and upset, but hopeful that police can change the way they deal with oftentimes young, unarmed black men. >> todd johnson, thank you so much. you were viewing that video on the left side of your screen, that was eric garner's widow who stopped there on the street. the rally today actually started in that location. pretty much the exact location where her husband was arrested. where he was put in that choke hold and died. she stopped there for a moment. you see her emotional there. a crowd gathered, in a march from there to the d.a.'s office to the rally point, which is only about a half mile up there on staten island.
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that was just a short time ago there in staten island. we turn from staten island where the focus has been on police excessive use of force to ferguson, where it's been the focus for several weeks now. new calls there for justice for an unarmed teen michael brown in. the last hour, people, young people gathered in st. louis to march while wearing sunglasses, because in their words, justice is blind. also this afternoon, unofficial supporters of officer darren wilson, the ferguson cop who shot mike brown, they're speaking out about what they say is bias against him. >> contrary to media suggestions, we are not affiliated with any hate groups. however, we respect each individual's first amendment rights in this country. we will no longer live in fear. we ask this question, can justice ever be obtained if one side of supporters are living in fear of speaking out? if you support darren wilson, make your voices heard. call or write governor jay nixon and demand that this bias stops
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now. >> msnbc's richard lui on the ground there in ferguson. it was a quiet night. relatively speaking, i should say last night from what we've seen over the past several weeks. but as we see on the ground, you set the tone for us as we're seeing competing rallies and yes, we are seeing supporters of darren wilson coming out and speaking out. >> you know, t.j., as we were both listening there to todd johnson and his report in the northeast, we can't help but think of what may be happening here as well. just a matter of an hour or so, you mentioned the naacp, that they were gathering with the sunglasses, having a march. we just got word about a mile up from here, which is where they're gathering, they're starting to cordon off and expect them to start soon coming down this way perhaps, because we're seeing for the first time law enforcement, as you can see some of the vehicles as well as some of the officers behind me. they just began to get out in the street and that's the first time today that we have seen that. now, that parallel, though, is
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offset by a sense of comfort that we have not seen here on fluorescent, the place where we saw tear gas, the place where we heard flash bangs going off. remember those late evenings -- i'm not sure if you can hear, but a second ago, we were listening to marvin gaye, what's beginning on. people are gathering like a block barbecue. religious groups are giving out food. the emotion on the ground seems to be "let's get together." but we know based on what is happening and in that several days, that could change very quickism and with the naacp coming down shortly with their march demanding some changes in the police department, they would like, for instance, to have cameras mounted on police officers. that's one of their requests. things can change. we have the grand jury. the two officers that were suspended. it's very quickly that things could change, but the sense is right now, t.j., that people just on this saturday, be it 94 degrees, just want to spend time
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together right here in ferguson. >> different tone there on the ground. thank you so much. we'll be checking back in with richard, and also as we've been reporting there, local leaders in ferguson expecting a three-night trend of calm. we'll continue hours from now when the sun goes down. captain ron johnson has been tirelessly leading the law enforcement effort on the streets. earlier this morning, captain johnson expressed his thanks for the support and guidance that gives him the strength to do it. >> chief dodson and i and others gathered with clergy. it's becoming part of our regular routine as we begin our nightly walk. we look forward to the fellowship, our resolve to make this community stronger. >> pastor tyrone robertson is with me now from ferguson as well. he's talked a lot about faith and a lot about prayer.
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i know you prayed with captain johnson as well. what do you pray for? >> we pray for really peace, peace of mind. really have been praying for him in secret, actually, when i saw him assigned to this position of being the head over this issue in ferguson, and with the shooting of michael brown. really just paying for peace and praying that he leads from his heart. i saw that he was a local, a guy from the community. and we really pray for that. we also pray for some of the other officers as well. just really praying for peace of mind for him, as well as to really lead like he's been doing. because i actually saw a change when he took over, and took over the authority on the streets. >> and things are calming down in the streets. we haven't seen clashes. but do you think the fire inside -- do you still get a sense that is inside people? people always get concerned we don't take a moment and turn it
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into a movement. we've just had a moment. we've seen the clashes. we've seen the passion. and then that's going to go away and everybody will go back to the way things were? >> well, that's actually what we pray for. because we understand that, you know, this is a moment. we understand that being from st. louis, born and raised, there's been a lot of crime. this is not the first time that -- even though this situation the shooting of mike brown is unique in and of itself, this is not the first time that a child has been shot in the streets unarmed. so we do realize as the church -- and i can speak from the perspective of my perspective, we do know this is a movement and we pray that this becomes a movement of love, peace, and healing, and that's the reason that many churches as well as our church is here, and we've been committed to prayer, and we do pray that, you know, even as the cameras leave and as the news stations leave, that we're here. we're invested into this community and we believe at this moment that the church needs to
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take advantage of it and this community needs love, the love of god, the healing from god, the justice of god, and you know, as well as the impact of just everybody playing their role and participating in their role. >> pastor, one last thing to you. we were showing pictures to our viewers a short time ago of a rally for darren wilson. there were people gathered to show their support for him. and frankly, people who have been fundraising for him online have outraised people who are raising money for mike brown, and mike brown's family. so what would you say to them? would you like to reach out to those supporters as well and maybe pray with them at the same time? your reaction and your feelings about the supporters of darren wilson and how maybe you can work with them to heal this community. >> yeah. and i believe that, you know, my main focus is really this community here. our community. because there's been a shooting of an innocent -- not an innocent, but an unarmed man.
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he's been shot. so to the supporters of darren wilson, i believe that that's their right. and i believe that -- i do believe that god loves us all. i believe that we're all part of god's creation. and so i definitely think that we need to focus on, you know, the family, the mother, the father, michael sr., and that they've lost a child. you know, we're supporting that. we're supporting the healing of this community. love, the peace, the community. and i believe that if i had a message for them, just pray for justice. because, you know, i believe that if they could be doing this in the right -- with the right motives, they'll be praying for justice as well. and that's what we're all seeking. we all want the justice of god. and we all want peace and healing and love in this community. and that's our role. >> pastor tyrone robertson, we appreciate you. we'll be keeping a close eye on what's happening in ferguson.
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we thank you for your time on this saturday. >> thank you. we're about 12 minutes past the hour. still ahead, we have new fears in this ebola crisis. two new cases show how time is of the essence when it comes to quarantining patients. also right now, an all-out search to find the terrorist who killed american journalist james foley. we'll show you what's happening right now to find him.
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a developing story right now. word of another u.s. military strike against isis forces that just happened. this one not far from the mosul dam targeting and destroying an isis vehicle. this is the 94th such air strike against isis forces in iraq this month. meanwhile, authorities are launching an all-out search for a masked man seen killing
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american hostage james foley. that haunting execution video was posted online this week. the killer is heard speaking with what sounds like a british accent. uk security forces say they're narrowing down the list of suspects. nbc's keir sim mmons with the latest. >> reporter: isis has many thousands of fighters, but british and american intelligence are focused on one man this weekend, the masked jihadist who holds a knife in his left hand and appears to have a british accent. james foley's killer. >> an american citizen of your country. >> reporter: experts will be analyzing his voice for collies to his identity. >> security services have databases of voices of people who they believe to be working in this sort of area. >> reporter: one british newspaper claims to know who he might be. another says police raids are planned. lawmakers want to final tackle so-called british jihadists.
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>> young men who are told it's necessary to go and leave in this country and go and fight in iraq and syria. >> reporter: more than 500 british citizens are estimated to have joined isis. many more from other parts of europe. recruitment that has caused soul searching in the uk. >> there is something wrong with our society. >> reporter: the vast majority of muslims oppose isis, a message repeated at friday prayers. but isis videos reveal a succession of fighters who have traveled to syria and iraq from the uk. >> the muslim community here needs to come out, and in many ways rise up against these people. >> reporter: leaving uncomfortable questions about why they go and why british authorities seem unable to stop them. >> thanks so much to nbc's keir simmons. want to turn now to a the
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ranking member of the subcommittee on intelligence and emerging threats. thank you for being here. talked in that piece about identifying the man in that video. do you have information that makes you feel pretty confident that intelligence officials are getting close to identifying him? >> first of all, thank you for having me on the program, t.j. we are getting much closer to understanding exactly who that individual in the video was. the intelligence community is working nonstop to identify that individual and i have confidence we'll know who that individual is. >> how soon do you believe? how much can you tell us? >> i can't put exact time on it. i just know that we're making significant progress on understanding who that individual is. >> there's also -- at least the chair of the armed services committee has called for a possible investigation into the leak of that failed raid to save james foley. we heard about that news this
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week as well. what's your take? should this be -- is this something we need to look into? >> well, the appropriate authorities will look into whether or not there was a leak or not. of course, the administration has confirmed there was an attempted rescue -- a rescue attempt to try to rescue the hostages. the mission was carried out flawlessly. unfortunately, the hostages were not there when they got in there, from what the administration has reported. but it just calls to mind the incredible bravery and courage of our special forces and the dangerous missions they take on at the government's request, and we all need to keep them in mind because they're professionals and very dedicated to protecting this country. >> let's turn to isis now and what's happening in iraq and syria. the chair of the joint chiefs says you cannot defeat isis without taking them out -- or taking them on at least in
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syria. do you believe that and do you believe that is what we must do? >> i believe that isil is a clear and present threat, a danger to u.s. national security, and our interests and allies around the world. if you can imagine that they are even more extreme than al qaeda, that's the reason why isil has broken off from al qaeda, they are extremely dangerous. and that we are going to have to back, to degrade their capabilities and ultimately prevent them from coming here. they are a significant threat. i look at this in many ways as a pre-9/11 moment. before 9/11, other than really the intelligence community or the national security apparatus, people had never heard of al qaeda or osama bin laden. and we saw what they were capable of. in this case, we know how violent isil is.
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secretary kerry called isil the face of evil, and he is correct. they are a threat to our national security, and we need to make sure that they can't come here and they can't destabilize the entire middle east. but that is what the threat is right now that we are facing. >> all right, rhode island congressman james langevin. sir, thank you so much. we'll have to leave it there for now, but we will have you back, and we know this story isn't going anywhere any time soon. thank you so much. >> thank you. we're 22 minutes past the hour. want to turn now quickly back to richard lui, who is there in ferguson for us. richard, set the scene for us. we were talking about this march going to be taking place, and there they are. >> reporter: t.j., this is what we're seeing right now. it is silent. this march that came by just moments ago, it's about three blocks long. you didn't hear a word. it reminded me as they are here doing the naacp march, wearing sunglasses, and they are asking for certain changes in the
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police department. you can get a sense of that picture right there, of how long this march is. but you couldn't hear a peep. put that in contrast to what we've been hearing and seeing over the last two weeks. this is what the leaders in the community wanted. they want a quiet protest to get out in the streets and tell them they care about what happened to michael brown. it reminds some, i think, of the martin luther king memorial marches that we have seen over the last year or two, where it's quiet. everybody in the street remembering what it meant to walk for peace. and i think that's what we saw here today with the captain. captain ron johnson out there. and he was out there leading them throughout this entire naacp march. also the chief of police standing right next to him. and i've got to tell you, t.j., it was quite emotional as you saw all of these people just walking by us, but you couldn't hear a single peep. and i think that is what they wanted to accomplish today. this march now turning back,
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heading back towards the target where they started. and just one of the activities that we'll be watching today. >> all right, richard lui, glad we could check back in with you. like richard said, the point being made. a lot can be said by simply being quiet. we'll be right back. can you pick me up at 6:30? ah... (boy) i'm here! i'm here! (cop) too late. i was gone for five minutes! ugh! move it. you're killing me. you know what, dad? i'm good. (dad) it may be quite a while before he's ready, but our subaru legacy will be waiting for him. (vo) the longest-lasting midsize sedan in its class. introducing the all-new subaru legacy. it's not just a sedan. it's a subaru. my motheit's delicious. toffee in the world. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would
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big fears, bigger questions, as nigeria reports two new cases of ebola virus. this time, we're seeing just how quickly this disease can spread despite a quarantine. nigeria's reporting the first two cases of secondary contact, testing positive for ebola. in other words, health officials say the two new patients caught ebola from two health workers who were already under quarantine. throughout nigeria, sierra leone, nigeria, guinea, 13 people have died from the ebola virus. in sharp contrast, the two americans treated for the ebola virus with an experimental drug have left the hospital here in the u.s. they're recovering at home now. that's dr. kent brantly you're seeing there. called his cure a miracle. missionary nancy writebol was released from the same hospital in atlanta on tuesday. want to bring in professor arthur kaplan. let me start with nigeria and why that's so concerning.
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secondary contact from someone who came in through the airport. this is not supposed to happen. >> not supposed to happen. nigeria is a big, sophisticated, relatively rich country. it's got a lot of doctors. should be able to quarantine. should be able to restrict travel. should be able to educate people. if you're throwing up, if you're sick, no airport for you. so the fact that these two cases happened is troubling. it's also bothersome because there's a lot of people coming and going around nigeria and through nigeria for business. that's a place you want to have absolutely good quarantine. >> this is the big fear. all we talk about is airports, people being able to move around. i don't want to call this isolated, but this has to be a cause for greater concern because that's a major airport, and somebody gets on a plane there is not caught and ends up somewhere else, we're having a different conversation. >> that's right. it's a big hub for africa, but it's a big hub to the rest of the world, too. so you and i spend some time, viewers know. we were worried about zmapp and
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who should get it. this reinforces the fact that what this ebola outbreak needs is good quarantine, lots of disinfectant and lots of, if you will, sensible action on the part of the individual. if you feel sick, don't get in a taxi. don't head to the airport. go to the hospital. >> two weeks ago, we talked. what happened in the past two weeks from there to here? what has happened with the ebola virus and the outbreak? it seems that things keep getting frankly worse, and there's not a lot of good news to report. the numbers keep going up, up, up. >> numbers are going up because, in fact, we didn't contain it quickly enough, so it's out in more places. the world has still been slow to respond to get in there with more boots on the ground. i wish there was a magic cure. maybe the drug helped, maybe it didn't. it's hard to know. one guy got it in spain and died. it's not 100% sure that this is a useful drug. what is useful, wash your hands, don't touch dead bodies.
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quarantine, isolate. that has to go into the active outbreak areas. the world's got to make sure -- you know, it's nice to talk about magic pills, but what we've got to do is give them gloves. >> what you're explaining to me sounds very simple. but the folks who need this information aren't watching msnbc right now. my question here, you lay out some simple things. got to get more boots on the ground. got to get the supplies in. why isn't it happening? this has been going on since december, this outbreak. you said the world is not reacting quickly enough. >> i hope we really do take a look at this later, what went wrong, but i think the outbreak in rural guinea, a place that was hard to get to, and to be quite honest, i don't know if people cared about it quite as much. got going, spread out from there. now it's reached people like nigeria. people are going to care now, because that's the door to the west, to the rest of the world. that's, if you will, a central african hub. so i think it was slow in part because of indifference.
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>> last thing here, just the pictures of kent brantly up walking around smiling. this is a guy, everybody was scared. he's landed in the u.s., we're following his balance down the road. now this ebola infected guy is walking around, smiling among us. what do these pictures do to our psyche do you think when it comes to ebola? >> i think we started thinking hey, there must be some magic fix. i tell you what i liked about his press conference. everybody hugged him. he's not infectious. they hugged him and patted him on the back. the message is once you're through it, you're not a risk to others. >> always good to talk to you. maybe i should just have you back and make sure we check in every couple of weeks. and hopefully -- >> we won't be talking about this. >> thanks so much. some say it's been a tough vacation for president obama. balancing the crisis in ferguson along with the fight against isis, some accuse the president of being tone deaf. is that fair really? our brain trust will get into that.
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take a look at your tv set there, folks. you're seeing young people there in -- this is in ferguson, just moments ago. a rally there organized by the naacp. young folks wearing shades, wearing their sunglasses. their point being that justice is blind. they're demanding justice for mike brown. they're marching in the neighborhood where he was shot and killed two weeks ago today. we've seen this all over the country today and over the past few weeks. our richard lui made the point that this was such a moving tribute and march today because you have so many people out there, but they are silent and making a point with their silence. this is happening in ferguson. we're watching plenty of this happening here in new york as well. meanwhile, the president is handling the situation in ferguson, dealing with that. he's made several comments about it. and he's been on vacation, as many people know, for the past
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several days. that's not the president. that's a different light-skinned brother. there he is. there he is. the president's golfing. let me bring in my brain trust. the president of africana studies at the university of pennsylvania. and amy holmes to my left, anchor of hot list and theblaze.com. so let me start with you, salamisha on those pictures. it happens every vacation for every president. it's never a good time to go on vacation because something's going on around the world. it doesn't look good if you're on a beach juxtaposed with a picture of whatever that other thing is. so the criticism -- fair? unfair? has the president found the right tone? he's given several comments on his vacation about what's happening. >> there's a criticism for just being on vacation. the optics of golfing doesn't look good under any conditions when we have this kind of combination. we have iraq, we have palestine,
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ferguson. but i do think the criticisms are different. i don't think they're all the say. one may be that he's on vacation. but i think the criticism about his lack of urgency in ferguson seems to me a very substantial criticism about maybe obama's long-term racial justice initiati initiatives, as opposed to maybe thinking about his reticence about wanting more u.s. intervention in iraq. he obviously wants us to be out of there but he understands the need for military intervention to protect a religious and ethnic minority there. i think there's different criticisms. it just happens to be all about the vacation. but i think there's a lot of substantial criticism coming about ferguson, which may simply be -- it's different than what's going on in iraq. >> does it seem that way? does it seem like there's a lack of urgency with the president? >> i think you saw a lot of people levying criticism about his golfing. ezra klein, who's mostly been pretty favorable, it was this juxtaposition about him giving this quite angry speech about james foley and about the
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beheading and he seemed very emotionally affected, and basically immediately afterward was on the golf course. so people always snipe at presidents like oh, should they be on vacation. that's always a little bit silly. but it's right here where it just seemed tonally off. it's not the end of the world that the president does something that's tonally off, but i think it was a strange choice to go out and golf right after that. i think in terms of the level of engagement, i think on ferguson, the president's judgment has partly been that when he's gotten involved in similar issues in the past, for example, with the arrest of the harvard professor, the president when he involves himself, it becomes a politically polarized issue, and i think his judgment may be that if he stays back, it will actually be more productive. it will make it less of a partisan issue and maybe get us closer to a better resolution. >> doesn't he have to be careful as well, we don't have all the information about what happened. can he come out so strongly and seem so supportive of mike brown, and here comes a video of
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him pushing a clerk. here comes video of him looking a certain way. so the president has to strike the right balance and be careful. >> i actually appreciate that the president has not interjected himself into the ferguson issue and letting the facts come to the fore. but in terms of the president's golfing, there are two issues. one was what appeared to be an emotional disconnect. that we have the beheading of an american. now, i clicked on the link to the video. when i heard the gurgling, i had to stop. i couldn't watch that. and then the president literally only minutes later smiling, high fiving, fist bumping, having a great time on the golf course, it didn't make a lot of sense. secondly, there's the issue of hours in the day. the white house is actually putting out very conflicting statements. they're saying when he goes to the golf course, he's thinking about being present 24/7. but at the same time, we have another statement saying actually, he goes to the golf course to clear his mind. so i think americans are saying, where is the president? where is the leadership? nbc, your sister media or parent media company, had a poll out
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early this summer that said 54% of americans do not have confidence in the president's leadership ability for the rest of his term. i think these golfing images just play into that. >> how did it work in ferguson with holder? i don't know how much credit he should get for things quieting down almost as soon as he got there. maybe things were going in that direction any waism but was that certainly the right move and a good move to have your top on the ground? >> yeah. i also want to say with the vacation imagery, it's lingering effect of george w. bush, right? so the amount of vacations he went on under certain conditions. so i think obama's inheriting the sense that he's on vacation too much, he's not being a good president. obama should get a pass for going on vacation. >> even senator dianne feinstein on msnbc told andrea mitchell that the world would appreciate the focus on these matters. he is getting members of his own party, the chair of the senate intelligence committee telling him that the time for inaction is over. this is extraordinary. we talked about this in the
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green room. it's extraordinary when top members of his own party are on the record with their names criticizing the president for his seeming distracted. >> i think these are two separate issues. i think the president throughout his presidency has had weak relationships with both parties in congress. i think there's discontent about that that's rising to the fore in part because the president is less popular. >> which your newspaper was touching on this week. >> absolutely. i think if the president had strong relations with congress, had been maintaining good, close personal links, especially with democrats and also with republicans, i don't think anybody would be complaining about him, any democrats would be complaining about him being on vacation this week. i don't think that's about him being on the golf course. i think that's about years of him not cultivating the sort of personal relationships in congress that say bill clinton or johnson did. >> president obama, you have the rest of your life to play golf. pick up the phone, talk to members of your own party. we even have the french foreign minister criticizing the president. >> i was just going to talk
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about holder. i do think, yes, of course, it's been transformative to have attorney general holder there in ferguson. i think the way that he's spoken both on a personal level but also initiating actual practices and policies to get to scenes of justice i think has helped tremendous slism b tremendously. but i also think ferguson is a combination of long history of american racial practices and racial profiling, but also the immediate history. we've gone through a long year of just dealing with young black people, men and women, being shot by private citizens and police officers, and this is a tipping point. i think holder's presence there helps, but i also think obama eventually will have to take a stronger position about this. >> i certainly appreciate that conversation. it went a little longer than i wanted to because of what's happening in iraq, syria, isis as well. but what does the president do first? he's going to have a lot of pressure to talk about ferguson, to talk about police brutality, the issues you're talking about. and yes, isis and syria and iraq
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and military intervention and immigration. what about that? what is he going to do first? what should he do first? let's make this a little quicker. >> very quickly. what we see with ferguson, i think he's done the correct thing, which is to delegate, delegate to eric holder and let the investigation progress. but his number one priority should be being commander in chief and protecting american national security. i think he's going to have to tim duncan his attention to foreign policy. we know that he's already bombing iraq. he's considering possible military strikes in syria. i think that's his priority. >> that's going to be the focus no doubt? >> i'm sure it is the focus of the administration. >> does it feel like that to the public? will it feel like that's the thing this president is talking about and focused most on? >> the problem is a lot of the things to do here are things to do in secret. they disclosed that they had made this raid on where we thought the hostages were being held earlier in the summer. it turned out the raid worked except that the hostages weren't there. what the president needs to do next depends a lot on what the intelligence says.
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it's not like we have 160,000 troops on the ground in iraq anymore. so our ability to control what happens on the ground there is limited. and that -- you know, those facts will drive what the president does. i think in terms of providing public leadership, i think he'll continue to make statements, but, you know, he can only do so much by making statements. i don't think we know yet exactly what he can do. >> i've got to go. what would you like to see him focus on? >> i think american citizens here in america also are important, and i think we see the african-americans are really vulnerable to all forms of violence, and i think that should be a priority. with two years left, i think it should finally get further up on the list. >> this is a good crowd. i need to have you all back together. i don't want to see you all without each other. good to see you all. thanks so much for being here this saturday. take a look at something else here. some new signs out that the u.s. has reached its multi-cultural tipping point. the countdown is on. that's according to research and marketing firm ethnifacts.
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it unveiled its countdown clock in times square yesterday. the clock is going to be counting down to the very minute the firm predicted white americans would be a minority, making the u.s. a majority multi-ethnic nation. that comes 29 years earlier than the u.s. census predicted. think the tree we carved our names in is still here? probably dead... how much fun is this?
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a noticeable change coming to the washington post. they will no longer refer to the washington nfl team by the full name. they say it's become more clear. the editorial board writes every time the r word is used something disrespectful is happening. use stories will continue to use the word. washington plays their third preseason game tonight against
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baltimore. we'll stick with sports for a second. women are scoring big in the nba. didn't say the wnba. the nba. in three weeks michelle roberts will take the helm as the nba head of the players association. she will be the first woman in the role. her election comes amid another big move. remember earlier this month san antonio spurs hired becky as the first full-time female assistant coach. it's a sign the back board may be shattering just a bit. thank you so much for being here. you're a lawyer, litigator. how did you get into the nba? >> it's not that difficult. i'm an avid basketball fan.
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between any love of the game and my love and respect of the players once i learned they were looking for some help it became something i could not shake. >> looking for some help, you wanted to help. sounds like you love the game. did you have concerns that or ever get the feeling they would be a little hesitant for a woman to take the helm in. >> i assume they would notice i was a girl but a long time ago i stopped being concerned about whether something might have a problem with the fact i'm a woman. we talked act it. i wanted to make sure there was no discomfort. i brought it up when i was being interviewed. i'm not one to be paralyzed by people's potential negative perceptions. i just keep plowing forward. >> you talked about it during interviews. will it play a role in you doing
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your job. you mentioned as well a black woman. is that going to be factor at all? >> of course. is it going to sb something i spend a lot of time thinking about, not at all. i am who i am. i love who i am. there will be people who will presumably think i'm not as smart or confident or forceful as strong. that's fine. that will be their problem. that will not be my problem. i think the fact that i'm a woman says a lot about the league, about the union and how positive my players are. my players don't find themselves crippled by stereotypes. they made it clear it wasn't going to be the case i wouldn't get the job because i was a woman. they made it clear i would only get the job if i were qualified. i'm feeling confident. >> what's the upside and what changes could you see and make that's going to be an advantage that you're a woman stepping into this role? >> well, my sisters will all
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agree with this point. i think women tend to not again a conversation or relationship with their fists. we begin by figuring out if there's common ground and if there is embracing it and talk about things to see if we can resolve matters. not necessarily unique to women but women do a lot better than men. that will be an advantage. >> i'll give you that. give me 30 seconds here . mone davis. >> she's my she-ro. i cancelled a meeting so i could see her play. she's such an inspiration to me. we know she's an inspiration. what a wonderful talent. >> i had to get your take on that young lady. you are just fantastic. this is my first chance to talk to you. i've been reading a lot about
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you. you come highly recommended. you've just been fantastic. look forward to talking to you plenty down the road. >> thanks for having me. >> that's our show for today. see you back here tomorrow at 3:00 eastern. ♪ in the nation, the safest feature in your car is you. add vanishing deductible from nationwide insurance and get $100 off for every year of safe driving. which for you, shouldn't be a problem.
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